Confused About The Iphone? Read This Article

It is important that you know the many uses of your iPhone; you will benefit more from owning it if you understand how it works. If you think that you are not getting the most out of everything your iPhone has to offer, read this article for some tips.

You should be sure to update your iPhone each time a new update is available. This means that your phone will always have what it needs to function properly. This will allow you to keep a backup of all your pictures and information so you do not lose everything if your phone is damaged or lost.

If you are online with your phone, you don’t have to type “.com” to end the URLs. All you need to do is enter the main section of the url, and your browser will guide you towards the right site. While it may not seem like much, doing so will save you a lot of time over the life of your phone.

You can message faster using this tip. You can dismiss a suggested word by tapping elsewhere on your screen. You do not need to hit the small “x” that follows the word.

It is possible to create an app from your commonly used sites. Begin by visiting a website in your iPhone’s browser. Once you get on the website, tap once on the “Go” option. Here, you’ll see the choice to add the website as an icon on your home screen. Adding your site to your home screen allows you to rename it. This creates a personalized app.

There is no need to press X every time AutoCorrect attempts to correct a word. Simple tap away on your screen to eliminate this alteration. This is the fastest way of closing the suggestion box.

The iPhone can help you organize daily tasks and many other useful things. Apply the tips from above to use the iPhone to it’s fullest.

The Western Digital WD Blue SN500 SSD Review: Moving The Mainstream To NVMe

Western Digital’s mainstream consumer drives have long been branded as WD Blue drives, and this carried over to SSDs after their acquisition of SanDisk. The first two generations of WD Blue SSDs were SATA drives using TLC NAND and were worthy competitors for the Crucial MX series and Samsung 850 EVO. The WD Blue SN500 is the third generation WD Blue SSD, and it moves the WD Blue brand over to a very different market segment: the SN500 is an entry-level M.2 NVMe drive.

Western Digital has been selling consumer NVMe drives for a few years using their high-end WD Black branding, but NVMe isn’t just for enthusiast products any more. For the past year we’ve been seeing most SSD brands offering a lower tier of NVMe products that sit between their SATA and high-end NVMe offerings, both in terms of price and performance. This entry-level NVMe niche has at times been squeezed down to https://www.energyitshop.com/Category-Laptops/Brand-HP/1 almost nothing when there are particularly well-priced high-end drives, but the general idea of splitting the consumer NVMe SSD market into two tiers isn’t going away. SATA is starting to be phased out of use for primary storage in client PCs. Western Digital started supporting that trend over a year ago with the PC SN520 SSD for OEMs, which the WD Blue SN500 is derived from.

Despite bearing the WD Blue name, the SN500 is functionally not a direct replacement for the SATA WD Blue SSDs. The SATA predecessors offered capacities up to 2TB, while the SN500’s only capacity options are currently 250GB and 500GB. Those are the most common and important capacity points for consumer SSDs, but the absence of 1TB and 2TB options are a glaring omission, especially now that 1TB drives are approaching $100. The lack of high-capacity versions of the SN500 make sense when considering the OEM SN520 it is based on: that drive was intended to compete against the smallest form factor SSDs used tablets and the thinnest notebooks. The OEM SN520 is available in form factors as small as M.2 2230, and even though the retail SN500 uses the more typical 80mm length that offers the broadest compatibility with consumer systems, it retains the same layout that puts all the electronics in the first 30mm of the card. The SN500 uses a design that was never intended to accommodate more than 512GB of flash. The extra length on the card is occupied only by the drive’s label.

MWC 2019: Nokia Annual Press Conference at Mobile World Congress (3pm UTC)

09:58AM EST – We are at HMD Global’s annual press conference at Mobile World Congress where the company shares information about its success in the past year and introduces new flagship models. Today we expect the company to launch its new flagship model, the Nokia 9, with a never-before-seen camera.

10:03AM EST – Like all press events from Nokia, this one starts with the Nokia Tune.

10:05AM EST – CEO of Nokia kicks off the press conference. First and foremost, he thanks Nokia fans and HMD’s staff for a strong 2018

10:05AM EST – CEO of Nokia kicks off the press conference. First and foremost, he thanks Nokia fans and HMD’s staff for a strong 2018

10:08AM EST – Nokia tripled its smartphone sales in 2018 vs 2017

10:09AM EST – The head of Nokia thanks fans and the HMD staff for this success

10:10AM EST – He mentions that Nokia innovates not only in the high end category, but also in the mainstream.

10:10AM EST – He mentions that Nokia innovates not only in the high end category, but also in the mainstream.

10:12AM EST – One important thing about the Nokia phones, he recalls, is that all of the company’s phones receive Android updates at a very fast pace, ahead of other brands.

10:14AM EST – Nokia stresses that with constant updates its phones keep getting better over time.

10:15AM EST – Chief product officer is on stage, now we are talking products.

10:16AM EST – He recalls the 2018 lineup first – from bottom to top. Nokia for Everyone!

10:16AM EST – Nokia has product announcements across all categories. They are starting with feature phones

10:18AM EST – Nokia 2.10. HMD’s most affordable Internet connected phone today

10:19AM EST – It takes pictures, plays Snake, browses the Internet, and does other essential operations.

10:19AM EST – It is set to cost $35

10:20AM EST – Moving on to Nokia 1.

10:22AM EST – Nokia 1 Plus is bigger, has more storage, longer battery life, etc.

10:23AM EST – It has a 5.45-inch display, 8MP main camera, improved imaging software. Of course, Android 9 Pie Go Edition

10:24AM EST – Set to be available in three colors at $99.

10:25AM EST – Time to talk about mass market smartphones.

10:25AM EST – Nokia 4, to be more precise

10:26AM EST – The Nokia 4.2 comes a large display with a small notch, a dual camera, the Snapdragon 439.

10:28AM EST – Moving a bit down the ladder. The new Nokia 3.

10:30AM EST – Nokia 3.2. An essential smartphone with a large display, Snapdragon 429, high-capacity battery, a dedicated Google Assistant button.

10:35AM EST – Both Nokia 3.2 and Nokia 4.2 will feature face unlock capability.

10:36AM EST – Obviously, imaging software and hardware is migrating to mass market devices. Both phones will feature depth sensor for bbokeh effect and other capabbilities

10:37AM EST – Nokia 3 starts at $139, whereas Nokia 4 will cost $169.

10:37AM EST – Finally! The Nokia 9 PureView!

10:39AM EST – Five 12 MP cameras (two RGB and two B&W sensors), controlled by a special ASIC.

10:40AM EST – To process images captured by the sensors, Nokia uses a custom ASIC developed by Light, Qualcomm CPU cores, Qualcomm DSP, and Qualcomm ISP.

10:42AM EST – Obviously, the camera also supports a 12MP depth map

10:44AM EST – New software supports 10 second exposure.

10:45AM EST – A professional photographer praises the Nokia 9

10:46AM EST – The Nokia 9 also supports samsung 64gb memory card price capturing RAW files and process them using a pre-installed Adobe Lightroom app.

10:48AM EST – The phone has an aluminum chassis with Gorilla Glass 5 on two sides.

10:50AM EST – Set to be available in late March, the Nokia 9 PureView will cost 699 dollars.

10:50AM EST – That’s it, time for some hands on!

AMD at CES 2019: Ryzen Mobile 3000-Series Launched, 2nd Gen Mobile at 15W and 35W, and Chromebooks

Everyone is keen for AMD to announce its next-generation processors, based on the 7nm Zen 2 architecture, which are expected to carry the 3000-series branding. However we’re still going to have to wait for those announcements; instead AMD is announcing its 12nm Zen+ Mobile processors today, with these processors going under the 3000-series branding.

These parts are upgraded versions of the first generation of Ryzen Mobile parts, the Ryzen 3 2300U and the Ryzen 5 2500U (codename: Raven Ridge), which found their way into a number of premium designs. These new second generation parts will take advantage of the upgraded microarchitecture going from Zen to Zen+, as well as the additional frequency headroom and lower power offered by GlobalFoundries’ 12nm process. The new processors will also expand the range of power envelopes that Ryzen Mobile is available under, from the top of the stack 35W Ryzen 7 3750H processor down to the 15W Athlon 300W for entry-level devices.

AMD’s reasoning for expanding its offerings, the company says, intel ssd 256gb is in part due to the shape of the notebook market. Based on data from analysts at IDC, the notebook market sells around 87-90 million units per year, but the sales distribution between the various market segments has changed from 2017 to 2018: there are fewer ‘mainstream’ products, more Chromebooks, more premium devices, and more gaming devices. By increasing the number of processors on offer, as well as the power/performance at both the high-end and the budget and value segments, AMD hopes to address most of the possible market in order to get a bigger slice of the pie. Usually the discussion here is about TAM, or ‘Total Addressable Market’, measured in billions of dollars – the more market you can address, the higher the TAM.

Also on AMD’s lips was the rationale behind some of its performance comparisons for the new processors. Much like Intel, AMD is quoting a MIcrosoft research report that states that the average time between notebook upgrades for an typical user is around five years. Because of this, AMD is sometimes comparing the performance of the new 2nd Generation Ryzen Mobile parts against a Broadwell (2014/2015 era) notebook. Other comparisons were against the latest Intel Coffee Lake-Refresh and Whiskey Lake processors.

Memory Frequency Scaling in SFF Systems: An Investigation with SO-DIMMs and Coffee Lake

Overclocking has generally been the domain of enthusiasts with desktop rigs. Though more recently we have seen even SFF PCs joining the bandwagon – Intel’s Hades Canyon NUC, for example, supports overclocking the CPU as well as the GPU. However, increasing the CPU frequency beyond the official specifications is not the only way to extract more performance from a computing system. Memory-bound workloads can benefit from memory hierarchies with increased bandwidth and/or lower latencies.

We last looked at DDR4 memory scaling effects on SFF PCs when we experimented with different SO-DIMMs in the Skull Canyon NUC (NUC6i7KYK) based on the Skylake platform. Current SFF PCs are based on Coffee Lake, which brings in more cores while keeping power efficiency in mind. Compared to the Skylake memory controller’s official limit of 2133 MT/s, the Coffee Lake memory controller ships with DDR4-2666 supported out of the box. In this article, we explore the effects of varying DDR4 SO-DIMM frequencies and timings on a SFF PC with a standard Coffee Lake desktop CPU.

Introduction
Since the introduction of DDR4 dell hard disk 1tb price support in the Skylake platform, we have seen expanded support for overclocked memory kits on both the desktop and notebook segments. On standard non-overclocked systems, the DDR4 memory controller in Coffee Lake desktop CPUs operates at 2666 MT/s, while the U-series CPUs have a 2400 MT/s interface. DDR4 DIMMs operating as high as 4266 MT/s are available for desktop systems with full-sized memory slots. On the SO-DIMM side, we have seen various vendors introduce kits operating between 2133 MT/s and 3200 MT/s. While 2400 MT/s has become the de-facto SO-DIMM frequency for current systems, the usage of desktop CPUs in SFF PCs such as the ASRock DeskMini have ensured that the higher frequency SO-DIMMs also have adoption.

The Google Pixel 3 Review: The Ultimate Camera Test

The Pixel 3 is Google’s third generation in-house design, meant to showcase the company’s own view of what an Android device should be, whilst fully embracing Google’s first-party software applications and services. The one thing Google’s Pixel phones have become synonymous with is the camera experience. The Pixel 3 continues this focal point of the line-up, and promises to be “the best smartphone camera”, period.

Alongside Google’s forte, software, this year’s Pixel family has pushed forward with a few hardware design choices, some of which we might have liked to have seen last year. The new units have updated panel technology, integrated wireless charging, and even fast wireless charging. Also now for Google, the Pixel 3 actually looks like a current flagship smartphone, compared to the Pixel 2 which did not at the time.

This year’s Pixel 3 phones hope to maintain the software advantages, doubling down on them with various new innovative features, especially on the camera side, whilst addressing the hardware aspects to be considered a true vendor flagship of a very competitive generation.

In this full analysis of the Pixel 3, we’ll cover the hardware, the design, the software, and a detailed look to what makes users rave about the camera. We’ve tested over 18 current and former high-end smartphones worth of cameras to get to our conclusions, with all the analysis contained within these few pages. Commentary is of course, more than welcome.

It should be noted that for this review, unfortunately we only were able to get our hands on a regular Pixel 3, colored in ‘Not Pink’. We do hope that sometime in the future we’ll be able to do a battery update on the bigger Pixel 3 XL once we’re able to source one.

Pixel Hardware and Design
In terms of hardware specifications, the new Pixel 3 family follows the many Android flagships trend of this year: at the heart of the phones, the Snapdragon 845 SoC is powering the devices. 2018 has been an excellent competitive year for Qualcomm and the S845 was able to take the performance lead among its Intel CPU competition. One thing to note here if you’re considering a Pixel device is that Google’s release schedule is very much out of sync with the silicon vendor’s SoC lineups – meaning users investing in a Pixel are buying a flagship phone whose silicon is by now 8 months old, and will most likely will be superseded by its successor in just a few months’ time. For those that want the leading edge, the Pixel 3 might be a short lived experience. However that doesn’t detract from what is under the hood today.

The Razer Phone 2 Hands On: Now With Wireless Charging, IP67, and RGB

When Razer announced its Razer Phone as a ‘gaming smartphone’, a sizeable number scoffed at the idea – how can it be a gaming smartphone if everyone has the same flagship hardware? In Razer’s own words, they were ‘carving a new market’ , with features like a 120Hz Ultramotion display and HDR, as well as a special fast chip under the hood. Razer says it easily met their sales expectations, and they are ready to announce the Razer Phone 2, a refined model with a number of extra requested features.

The Razer Phone 2
The new phone looks, from the front, practically identical to the old one. It has the same 5.72-inch IGZO LCD display, with a 2560×1440 resolution and running up to a variable 40-120Hz. This display is rated at 645 nits peak, up to 50% higher than the previous Razer Phone, and also supports HDR.

Also on the front, it has two front facing speakers in identical positions to the previous generation, and it has a front facing camera and sensor (albeit with swapped positions). That front camera is an 8MP f/2.0 unit, capable of recording at 1080p60, a user-requested feature for streaming and selfie recording. The front of the device is Corning Gorilla Glass 5, an upgrade from GG3 in the last generation.

When we move to the rear, things change much more noticeably. Instead of the aluminium rear, Razer has a full Gorilla Glass 5 back, which helps enable Qi Wireless Charging, a much requested feature. This is alongside QuickCharge 4+ through a Type-C cable. On the rear we have the dual cameras, this time placed in the center just above the logo. This time around Razer has gone with a 20MP Sony IMX363 f/1.75 main camera with OIS, and an 8MP Sony IMX 351 f/2.6 telephoto camera to enable some extra zoom functionality. These cameras can record in 4K60 or 1080p120, although not in HDR.

One of the biggest criticisms with the original Razer phone was the rear camera quality, and Razer states that along with the hardware improvement, the software is also a step above the previous generation. In this instance the user has access to features such as panorama shot, portrait mode, face beauty, timer, and the usual things we expect from a modern smartphone camera. This is Razer’s second generation software, which means they’re still behind the main smartphone manufacturers who are on their 8th/9th versions of software, but a step in the right direction is a good thing.

Below the cameras is the Razer logo, which has a full 16.8million color RGB LED underneath which users can adjust through the onboard Chroma software.

The $120 MSI X470 Gaming Plus Review: Only 4-Phase VRM, Not 11-Phase as Advertised

We’ve seen a steep increase in ‘gaming’ branded motherboards over the last half a decade and the one on our test bench today is at the forefront of the ‘gaming’ mantra. The MSI X470 Gaming Plus is a mid-range gaming themed motherboard which as it currently stands (at the time of writing) is the cheapest full-sized ATX X470 entry-level option at a cost of $120. For the $120 MSI have included a selection of mid-level controllers such as a Realtek ALC892 HD audio codec which offers five 3.5mm gold plated audio jacks and a S/PDIF optical out, as well as a Realtek RTL8111H Gigabit controller powering the single LAN port on the rear panel of the board. Further connections include a pairing of video outputs consisting of a DVI-D and an HDMI 1.4 port. The X470 Gaming Plus is compatible with the Ryzen 2000 series APUs, the Ryzen 5 2400G ($169) and Ryzen 3 2200G ($99) on top of the Ryzen first and second-generation desktop processors. A total of four USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-A ports make up the bulk of the rear panel USB real estate an additional two USB 2.0 ports. MSI has opted to omit any USB Type-C ports and has instead chosen to include two USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-A ports. Users of older keyboard and mice can make use of the included PS/2 combo port.

Low budget doesn’t necessarily mean low quality, and although there are always exceptions to this rule, MSI looks to break the stigma behind this with their lowest cost X470 chipset motherboard, the X470 Gaming Plus. This model is specifically aimed at gamers looking to be more gingerly with their cash which allows users to potentially upgrade their other components without sacrificing too much on quality. With a selection of components including a Realtek pairing consisting of an ALC892 HD audio codec and RTL8111H Gigabit LAN controller, MSI’s attempt to dominate the low to mid-range X470 market with this $120 offering hinges on its implementation and performance.

The i-Rocks Pilot K70E Capacitive Gaming Keyboard Review: Our First Capacitive Keyboard

We have reviewed many keyboards here in AnandTech, both electronic (membrane) and mechanical. In today’s market, most cost-effective keyboards are based on membrane designs, while more advanced keyboards are using mechanical switches that are either made by Cherry or, usually, are a “cloned” version of their products. Recently however we had something relatively rare shipped for testing in our labs – the i-Rocks Pilot K70E, a keyboard with unique capacitive switches.

Capacitive switches are not something unique to this keyboard. As a matter of fact, the current top-of-the-line capacitive keyboard switches were introduced by Topre several years ago. The problem with Topre-based products is that their prices are excessive, placing them well outside what the mainstream market can afford.

The i-Rocks Pilot K70E keyboard that we are reviewing today has non-contact capacitive switches developed in-house by i-Rocks itself. The Taiwanese company’s capacitive switches are available in two variants, 45g and 60g, with slightly different force-to-travel charts. The retail price of the Pilot K70E is rather steep, with the keyboard retailing at $150 at the time of this review, and yet that price is significantly lower than that of any keyboard using Topre’s capacitive switches.

Hands-on with the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti: Real-time Raytracing in Games

After yesterday’s announcement from NVIDIA, we finally know what’s coming: the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, GeForce RTX 2080, and GeForce RTX 2070. So naturally, after the keynote in the Palladium venue, NVIDIA provided hands-on demos and gameplay as the main event of their public GeForce Gaming Celebration. The demos in question were all powered by the $1200 GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition, with obligatory custom watercooling rigs showing off their new gaming flagship.

While also having a presence at Gamescom 2018, this is their main fare for showcasing the new GeForce RTX cards. In a separate walled-off area, NVIDIA offered press some gameplay time with two GeForce RTX supporting titles: Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Battlefield V. Otherwise, they also had a veritable army of RTX 2080 Ti equipped gaming PCs for the public, also demoing Battlefield V and Shadow of the Tomb Raider (without RTX features), along with Hitman 2 and Metro: Exodus. Additionally, there were a few driving simulator rigs for Assetto Corsa Competizione, including one with hydraulic feedback. These games, and more, support real-time ray tracing with RTX, but not necessarily Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS), another technology that NVIDIA announced.